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Beverley

Age at interview: 52
Brief Outline: Five years ago, Beverley had arthroscopy manipulation to help with a frozen right shoulder. Two years later, she had the same problem in her left shoulder; had the same type of surgery and regained full movement of her left shoulder. Six months later, her left shoulder became painful and stiff, limiting arm movement. She had decompression surgery three weeks ago and says her left shoulder is still painful and stiff. She still takes painkillers at bedtime and she is doing her rehabilitation exercises three times a day.
Background: Beverley is married with three adult children and grandchildren. She works part-time as a receptionist. Ethnic background: White British.

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Five years ago, Beverley had arthroscopy manipulation to help with a frozen shoulder. The procedure improved the range of movement of her right shoulder but two years later, she had the same problem in her left shoulder and needed the same type of operation. Again, the surgery was successful and she regained full movement of her left shoulder, but six months later the left shoulder again became painful and stiff. The specialist told her she had an impingement (trapped shoulder tendon) and referred her for physiotherapy, but exercise didn’t help. In fact, it was making it worse. The physiotherapist referred her back to the specialist. Beverley had two steroid injections that provided short-term relief from pain. The consultant then indicated that surgery was the next option. Initially, the surgeon thought that she might also have a rota cuff tear, but after surgery, she was told it was just the buildup of calcium that had been causing her shoulder problem. She was relieved to hear that, because she knew that a tear in the rota cuff would have meant a longer recovery period. Her surgery went well and she thinks that the nerve block was ‘brilliant’. 

Beverly saw the Technology Enhanced Patient Information (TEPI) video once at the time of her pre-op assessment and didn’t feel the need to see it again before surgery. She felt the TEPI site answered all her questions. 

Before surgery, her range of movement was so poor that it was affecting her every day as well as her work life. Three weeks after surgery the shoulder was still painful and stiff, particularly at night. Following her surgery, she was on painkillers every four hours, but now she takes them just before bedtime. 

Beverly is doing three lots of exercise every day as well as doing house chores. Her husband looked after her when she first came back from hospital, but now she feels that light chores help with her recovery. She hopes to be much improved by the time of her follow-up appointment in three weeks’ time. One of the issues she would like to ask her surgeon is whether the calcium build-up - that has affected her twice – is likely to reoccur.

Beverley currently uses the hospital exercise leaflet, but she is thinking of using her iPad to follow the rehabilitation programme available on the TEPI site.
 

Beverley likes having information in written and visual formats. Older people don’t always use a computer so having both formats is useful.

Beverley likes having information in written and visual formats. Older people don’t always use a computer so having both formats is useful.

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Are you following the exercises that they gave you?

Yes, yes, yes and of course they say, “Use it as much as possible.” So that’s what I‘ve been doing.

Okay. But you haven’t used the 3D pictures and the video to look at the exercise? 

No, I should, shouldn’t I. [laughs] No. No.

Okay, because 

I’ve got booklets. I’ve been taking them from the booklet, which I think is the same as what you, from the film.

Do you feel equally comfortable to be using the booklet as to be using the information on the internet? Or which one do you prefer?

Well, it’s easier to use the booklet because where my computer is, I can’t really do the exercises, do you know what I mean? So it’s easier to do the exercises, do them up in the bedroom and stuff. 

Ah okay, okay. So it’s just a question of where, the location of the computer more than anything else. Okay, do you have an iPad? 

Yes, I do. 

Okay. Would you, have you tried to look at?

No, I haven’t actually, no. But yeah, that’s a good idea. Yeah.

Okay, so you think more in terms of computer for this type of 

Yes, I know but I have been having a bit of trouble with my iPad on the internet so I suppose that’s why I’ve been doing it by the book really.

Okay, but do you feel, would you feel equally sort of comfortable using the booklet or the 

Either really.

What do you think is the best way to be, to give this kind of information for people who are going to have surgery? Is it leaflet or is it on line, or is it both?

Both I would say because you know, like an older person, you know, like my mother for example, she wouldn’t have a computer. So, yeah, you need both really because older people they don’t go to the computer do they? So...

Okay, so it needs to be kept in both formats.

Yes, definitely, definitely.
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