Charke

Gender: Agender

Pronouns: They/Them

Charke identifies as agender and they are questioning their sexuality. They came out as trans when they were about thirteen years old and pursued a social transition when they were about fourteen years old. When they initially came out as trans in 2013 and began their social transition in 2014, they felt comfortable identifying as female. Now, however, they consider themselves agender. They say I’m still on this journey of discovering myself and that’s where I am now

It was in secondary school when Charke started puberty that they noticed that their gender identity and identity assigned at birth did not align. When asked about their first experiences of being trans, Charke says it is hard to put my fingers on how I feltI have felt weird or off on many occasions throughout my life Charke says they are cautious about labelling themselves because they are always discovering new things about themselves and their gender identity.

Charke has received counselling through Childhood and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). Charke was referred to the gender identity development service (GIDS). Charke says to other trans people to think carefully, do what you want to do and take time

Charke reflects on the idea of gender as being a social construct, so advises others to reject it and instead be true to themselves. Charke says we have seen off of history and all sorts of different societies that have genders outside of the binary They reflect on the Philippines, for example, who have the fa;afaine third gender who fulfil a different role to men and women. Charke says these constructs hurt trans people the most and that if they did not exist trans people could be free to present how they like.

Charke says to GPs and other health professionals to keep up to date with trans health care information as it is constantly changing. They conclude by saying being able to talk with them [health professionals] like that is really, really helpful to someone who needs that help at that time

Charke talks about the journalism surrounding puberty blockers as quite disappointing’ and how fearmongering’ and misinformation is allowed to continue.

Age at interview 17

Charke talks about their experiences of engaging with the most toxic communities’ and entering into debates.

Age at interview 17

Charke wants a major overhaul of CAMHS’ and supporting the mental health of trans people.

Age at interview 17

Charke talks about CAMHS being an underfunded service that does the best they can with what they’ve got.

Age at interview 17

Charke talks about the value of LGBTQ+ youth groups when discussing sexual health.

Age at interview 17

Charke had concerns about the binary systems of registering for university with UCAS. The forms only had option of male or female.

Age at interview 17

Charke talks about the significant negative impact of going through puberty.

Age at interview 17

Charke had felt in such a bad state’ in the past that they decided they had to make a change or transition.

Age at interview 17

Charke says the LGBT groups which I attend [are] really greatI can have a friendly conversation with someone who knows what I’m talking about.

Age at interview 17

Charke speaks about their experience of multiple transitions and how they will always be working things out.

Age at interview 17

Charke talks about their difficult experience transitioning at school and the changes made.

Age at interview 17