Erion

Gender: Male

Pronouns: He / His / Him

Erion describes being diagnosed with gender dysphoria as a massive weight taken off his shoulders because for years he had felt uncomfortable in his body and was unaware that everyone else did not feel the same way.

After coming out as transmasculine to close friends, Erion spent some time talking with them about which name would fit him best and when he decided on a new name, he started asking people to use it. Coming out was a constant process of telling people he had not spoken to for a while. Finding out that he was trans was an educational and learning journey for his family members.

Deciding to start medically transitioning was a decision that involved a lot of talking to people who had experience of taking testosterone and finding out about the side effects they experienced.

Erion has had mixed experiences with GP care. He feels some GPs are supportive and ask which name and pronouns to use and how to provide support and others give a negative reaction to their patient identifying as trans. He feels NHS trans healthcare follows rigid guidelines and criteria where trans people are expected to match certain criteria in order to fit the criteria for referral which he finds frustrating. Erion believes that everyone’s experience is unique and valid and that there is no set way to be trans just as there is not one way to be human either.

Erion’s experiences of private healthcare have been markedly easier and a lot clearer than the NHS. He has been able to get responses to his questions a lot easier and provided with the information he needed.

Erion believes that passing is based on people’s preconceived notions of what a man or a woman should look like and realising that and knowing that he feels comfortable in his own sense of self has made it easier. Erion feels he does not fit the typical masculine expectation of what identifies as a trans man, but he knows who he is, and he is content in his identity and even though it might not align with somebody else’s experience of being trans it is valid for him.

Erion talks about the conflict with his GP surrounding gender presentation, names and pronouns.

Age at interview 22

Erion says trans healthcare processes should be changed and be made more inclusive and suggests ways health care professionals can support their trans patient.

Age at interview 22

Erion describes his super frustrating’ experience of being on the waiting list a long radio silence.

Age at interview 22

Erion shares his excitement for starting masculinising hormone therapy it’s going to be amazing.

Age at interview 22

Erion talks about his experience of sickle cell anaemia and the assumptions of healthcare professionals.

Age at interview 22

Erion talks about a local trans friendly healthcare service which is an amazing resource’ dealing with HIV, STI testing, sexual assault and unwanted pregnancies.

Age at interview 22

Erion says it’s incredibly frustrating because [the media] go into a lot of things without all the facts.

Age at interview 22

Erion talks about trying to convince his GP to have a shared care agreement with a private healthcare provider.

Age at interview 22

Erion says I ended up coming out like three times, maybe’ and talks about the constant coming out’ process.

Age at interview 22

Erion talks about his experience of changing university when he didn’t feel respected.

Age at interview 22

Erion describes a shocking’ lack of information and a lack of signposting.

Age at interview 22

Erion says that trans patients should know their rights about what they can expect from a GP.

Age at interview 22

Erion says finally having a word to describe a lot of what I was feeling’ felt like a massive weight off my shoulders.

Age at interview 22