A-Z

Family Experiences of Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States

Credits

Jenny Kitzinger

Jenny Kitzinger is Professor of Communications Research at Cardiff University and co-director of the Coma and Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre which specialises in examining social and ethical aspects of the vegetative and minimally conscious state. Jenny studies cultural representation of health and scientific issues and ethical debates around technology. She served on the Nuffield Bioethics Council working party on novel neurotechnologies and the Royal College of Physicians working party on disorders of consciousness helping to develop new national guidelines. 

Celia Kitzinger

Celia Kitzinger is professor of Gender, Sexuality and Conversation Analysis at the University of York and co-director of the Coma and Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre which specialises in examining social and ethical aspects of the vegetative and minimally conscious state. Her research examines how language is used in ordinary social interactions and the workplace, especially in health care settings where so much depends on effective communication. She has also worked extensively on exploring how to support people writing Advance Decisions.

Acknowledgments 
We are very grateful for all the help and support we have received in producing this module. 

Advisory Panel

Gunars Libeks and Margaret Kellas 
Family Representatives

David Menon 
Professor and Head of the Department of Anaesthesia, Principle Investigator in the Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre and co-chair of the acute brain injury programme at the University of Cambridge

Richard Morris
Headway, Information Officer

Andrew Taylor 
Headway, Website Manager

Lynne Turner Stokes 
Director of the Regional Rehabilitation Unit and Dunhill Chair of Rehabilitation, and chair of Royal College of Physicians’ working party on Prolonged Disorders of Consciousness

Sue Ziebland
Professor of Medical Sociology, Research Director, Health Experiences Research Group, Department of Primary Care, University of Oxford.


Acknowledgements and thanks 
To all those who took part in interviews, and the professionals who helped us recruit participants, and to our sister, Polly Kitzinger, who inspired this research.

Supported by:
Economic and Social Research Council, Knowledge Exchange Grant [ES/K00560X/1]

Financial support from the Health Experiences Research Group
 

Previous Page