A-Z

Interview 26

Age at interview: 35
Age at diagnosis: 33
Brief Outline: Her medication (lamivudine, efavirenz and ddI) brought her viral load down to undetectable, but she has had some side effects like loss of memory, tiredness and nightmares. She does get depressed at times, but has a faith that God is helping her. (Video and audio clips read by an actor.)
Background: A 35 year old woman who came to the UK 3 years ago. She found out she was HIV positive in 2003, and her visa to stay has now expired.

More about me...

Age at interview' 35

Age at diagnosis' 33

Sex' Female

Background' A 35 year old woman who came to the UK 3 years ago. She found out she was HIV positive in 2003 when she visited her GUM clinic. 

Outline' A 35 year old woman who came to the UK 3 years ago. She found out she was HIV positive in 2003 when she visited her GUM clinic. Her visa to stay has now expired. She believes she will be unable to obtain anti-viral medication if she is deported. She feels fortunate to have a solicitor helping her, although she is unable to work because of her immigration application, and does not receive benefits. She is dependant on her current partner for financial support. Her combination therapy (lamivudine, efavirenz and ddI) brought her viral load down to undetectable and she currently has a CD4 count of 320. However, side-effects have included loss of memory, tiredness, nightmares and loss of appetite. She does get depressed at times, but has a strong faith that God is helping her, and that she will live to old-age. She plans to have a baby with her partner.

(Video and audio clips read by an actor.)

 

Sees people as more isolated in the UK and misses her extended family ties in Africa. (Read by an...

Sees people as more isolated in the UK and misses her extended family ties in Africa. (Read by an...

SHOW TEXT VERSION
PRINT TRANSCRIPT

There is so much choice here in the UK and loneliness. Even in midst of people. Apart from HIV, only HIV. In England there is so much loneliness, people don't have time for people. Even families don't have time, there is too much stress. Trying to meet up, trying to meet up, there is too much stress. In midst of people, even within… if you have an immediate family you could still be lonely. And in Africa we don't have that kind of set up. People keep too much to their self here. People don't care what is happening to their relative or their neighbour. They have… the family tie, there is no family ties in England. There is none.

 

She is scared and feels trapped without work or benefits while her immigration matters are sorted...

She is scared and feels trapped without work or benefits while her immigration matters are sorted...

SHOW TEXT VERSION
PRINT TRANSCRIPT

And I'm really, really, real, really scared because, if anything, if I'm sent back home, I'm just sent back home to die. I don't know if my application will be considered, and new laws keep changing, new things keep changing, and say the Home Office say no, I'd have to go back, there is medication in your country, there is that. 

And another thing, I overstayed my visa. And there was a time I was destitute, I didn't have anywhere to stay. I went to the social service in the area I live, and they said I'm over age.

Well what I, what I find out is… like I keep telling all these support groups, if you're, if you are HIV positive, no matter what your status is, if you have children, they give… there is consideration for people with children, than you be single. That is what I just find out. And they keep saying it's not... but that is the truth. If I have a children, and I'm HIV positive, I would have been able to get something.

And why, and why can't you get any benefits?

Because I go and they told me that… They keep telling me oh yeah, there, there… and I'm fed up with it. I don't have social service… I don't get anything. I'm not bothered about that, I don't want to live on the… apart from the medication, I don't want to live on charity. I don't I… and as the system is... formerly like two years ago, if you're HIV positive Home Office, if you're OK… if you're able to work, they will give you a permit to work. But as it is now, what they are saying is… if you are healthy enough to work, then you can go back to your country of origin and work and pay for your medication. So it's two edged sword.

Previous Page
Next Page